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Top 10 Travel Tips

Top 10 Travel Tips

Top 10 Travel Tips

01.

Check the latest travel advice and subscribe to receive free email notifications each time the advice for your destination is updated.

 

02.

Take out comprehensive travel insurance and ensure it covers you for the places you plan to visit and the things you plan to do.

 

03.

Before travelling overseas register your travel and contact details online so someone can contact you in case of an emergency.

 

04.

Make sure your passport has at least six months' validity from your planned date of return  Carry extra passport photos in case your passport is lost or stolen and you need to replace it while you're away.

 

05.

Check with health professionals for information on recommended vaccinations and other health precautions. Remember that vaccinations can be an entry requirement for some countries. Also find out about taking medication overseas - certain medicines aren't allowed in some countries.

 

06.

Make sure that you have the right visas for the countries you are visiting or transiting and check any other entry or exit requirements.

 

07.

Check to see if you're regarded as a national of the country you plan to visit, and whether dual nationality will have any implications for your travel plans.

 

08.

Make copies of your passport details, insurance policy, travellers cheques, visas and credit card numbers. Carry one copy in a separate place to the originals and leave a copy with someone at home.

 

09.

Obey the laws of the country you're visiting even if these seem harsh or unfair by your own standards. Don't expect to be treated differently from the locals.

 

10.

Keep in contact with friends and family back home and give them a copy of your itinerary so they know where you are.

Top 10 Travel Tips

01.

Check the latest travel advice and subscribe to receive free email notifications each time the advice for your destination is updated.

 

02.

Take out comprehensive travel insurance and ensure it covers you for the places you plan to visit and the things you plan to do.

 

03.

Before travelling overseas register your travel and contact details online so someone can contact you in case of an emergency.

 

04.

Make sure your passport has at least six months' validity from your planned date of return  Carry extra passport photos in case your passport is lost or stolen and you need to replace it while you're away.

 

05.

Check with health professionals for information on recommended vaccinations and other health precautions. Remember that vaccinations can be an entry requirement for some countries. Also find out about taking medication overseas - certain medicines aren't allowed in some countries.

 

06.

Make sure that you have the right visas for the countries you are visiting or transiting and check any other entry or exit requirements.

 

07.

Check to see if you're regarded as a national of the country you plan to visit, and whether dual nationality will have any implications for your travel plans.

 

08.

Make copies of your passport details, insurance policy, travellers cheques, visas and credit card numbers. Carry one copy in a separate place to the originals and leave a copy with someone at home.

 

09.

Obey the laws of the country you're visiting even if these seem harsh or unfair by your own standards. Don't expect to be treated differently from the locals.

 

10.

Keep in contact with friends and family back home and give them a copy of your itinerary so they know where you are.

Wild Bird Feeding Tips

Feeding garden birds

The modern approach to garden bird feeding is to use a range of foods that support the specific nutritional requirements of a wide range of species over the course of a year. There is a scientific evidence highlighting the positive effects that the provision of supplementary food can have on birds. For example, the provision of supplementary food has been shown to improve overwinter survival in a number of species.

What foods should I provide?

Many garden birdwatchers provide black sunflower seeds and sunflower hearts as their staple foods. Alongside these, quality peanuts, nyjer seed and high-energy seed mixes are all greatly appreciated. There are other foods, e.g. sultanas (soak in water first) that are good for ground-feeding Blackbirds, while pinhead oats are ideal for fine-billed Dunnocks (but should not be left out in wet weather). Windfall apples and small amounts of finely grated mild cheese can be very useful, particularly in the winter, while peanut cake (a mix of fats and peanut flour) will attract species like Long-tailed Tit. Fat smeared into cracks in tree bark will be found by Treeecreepers and woodpeckers.  Live foods, such as mealworms, are expensive but are readily taken by Robins, Blackbirds and Wrens.

Black sunflower seeds:

Black sunflower seed was introduced in the early 1990s and revolutionised bird feeding by providing a high energy food in a readily accessible form. Black sunflower seeds have thinner husks than the more traditional striped sunflower seeds and so are easily to split open. Black sunflower seeds are a favourite of Greenfinches and tits, though they may be shunned if sunflower hearts are available nearby. The downside of feeding these seeds is the pile of husks left below the feeder.

Sunflower hearts:

Sunflower hearts are more expensive than black sunflower seeds but they have two advantages. First, the birds can feed more quickly because they do not have to remove the husk. Second, the lack of the husk means that there is no unsightly pile of husks left behind on the ground after the birds have had their fill.

 Seed mixes:

Seed mixes come in a vast range, differing in content and quality. Cheap mixes often have a high proportion of cereal. These larger grains are favoured by sparrows and pigeons. Better quality mixes have a lower cereal content and so are particularly suitable for finches and buntings. The best mixes are carefully balanced to cater for a range of species. Some now contain added suet pellets, fruit or pieces of mealworm.

 Peanuts:

Peanuts are high in oils and proteins and have been used for feeding birds form many decades. Always buy good quality peanuts from a reputable source and avoid any that show any signs of mould. Peanuts are best supplied behind a wire mesh so that a bird cannot take a whole peanut away. Keep you peanuts in a cool and dry environment and buy them in small quantities, so that they do not sit around for too long. Peanuts can be contaminated with a naturally occurring poison called aflatoxin.

Nyger:

 Nyger, sometimes seen spelt nyjer or sold as 'thistle' seed, is a relatively new addition to the bird feeding market and it is one that initially found favour with Goldfinches - which seemed to like the small size of these seeds. Because these seeds are so small they have to be supplied in a specially adapted feeder. They are oil rich and ideal for birds with delicate bills. There is some suggestion that Goldfinches now favour sunflower hearts, only moving onto the nyger when competition on other feeders is great. However, this may just be a local effect.

 Mealworms:

Mealworms are not worms but the larval stage of a beetle. It is the larvae of the Yellow Mealworm Tenebrio molitor that are used widely as food for wild birds, as well as captive birds, reptiles and amphibians. Another less common but similar species, the Dark Mealworm Tenebrio obscura is sometimes used, the larva being somewhat smaller in size.

 How much to feed and when

Try to balance the amount of food that you provide against the number of birds coming in to feed. In this way you will avoid creating a surplus of food that might go off or attract unwanted visitors, such as rats. Good practice is to clear your bird table down each night, removing uneaten food and any droppings.

Feeding throughout the year is recommended by conservation organisations, as it is not just during the winter that birds are under stress. If you are going away on holiday, then reduce the amount of food provided in the days leading up to your departure so the birds don't find that their favoured resource has suddenly disappeared.

 

Feeding garden birds

The modern approach to garden bird feeding is to use a range of foods that support the specific nutritional requirements of a wide range of species over the course of a year. There is a scientific evidence highlighting the positive effects that the provision of supplementary food can have on birds. For example, the provision of supplementary food has been shown to improve overwinter survival in a number of species.

What foods should I provide?

Many garden birdwatchers provide black sunflower seeds and sunflower hearts as their staple foods. Alongside these, quality peanuts, nyjer seed and high-energy seed mixes are all greatly appreciated. There are other foods, e.g. sultanas (soak in water first) that are good for ground-feeding Blackbirds, while pinhead oats are ideal for fine-billed Dunnocks (but should not be left out in wet weather). Windfall apples and small amounts of finely grated mild cheese can be very useful, particularly in the winter, while peanut cake (a mix of fats and peanut flour) will attract species like Long-tailed Tit. Fat smeared into cracks in tree bark will be found by Treeecreepers and woodpeckers.  Live foods, such as mealworms, are expensive but are readily taken by Robins, Blackbirds and Wrens.

Black sunflower seeds:

Black sunflower seed was introduced in the early 1990s and revolutionised bird feeding by providing a high energy food in a readily accessible form. Black sunflower seeds have thinner husks than the more traditional striped sunflower seeds and so are easily to split open. Black sunflower seeds are a favourite of Greenfinches and tits, though they may be shunned if sunflower hearts are available nearby. The downside of feeding these seeds is the pile of husks left below the feeder.

Sunflower hearts:

Sunflower hearts are more expensive than black sunflower seeds but they have two advantages. First, the birds can feed more quickly because they do not have to remove the husk. Second, the lack of the husk means that there is no unsightly pile of husks left behind on the ground after the birds have had their fill.

 Seed mixes:

Seed mixes come in a vast range, differing in content and quality. Cheap mixes often have a high proportion of cereal. These larger grains are favoured by sparrows and pigeons. Better quality mixes have a lower cereal content and so are particularly suitable for finches and buntings. The best mixes are carefully balanced to cater for a range of species. Some now contain added suet pellets, fruit or pieces of mealworm.

 Peanuts:

Peanuts are high in oils and proteins and have been used for feeding birds form many decades. Always buy good quality peanuts from a reputable source and avoid any that show any signs of mould. Peanuts are best supplied behind a wire mesh so that a bird cannot take a whole peanut away. Keep you peanuts in a cool and dry environment and buy them in small quantities, so that they do not sit around for too long. Peanuts can be contaminated with a naturally occurring poison called aflatoxin.

Nyger:

Nyger, sometimes seen spelt nyjer or sold as 'thistle' seed, is a relatively new addition to the bird feeding market and it is one that initially found favour with Goldfinches - which seemed to like the small size of these seeds. Because these seeds are so small they have to be supplied in a specially adapted feeder. They are oil rich and ideal for birds with delicate bills. There is some suggestion that Goldfinches now favour sunflower hearts, only moving onto the nyger when competition on other feeders is great. However, this may just be a local effect.

 Mealworms:

Mealworms are not worms but the larval stage of a beetle. It is the larvae of the Yellow Mealworm Tenebrio molitor that are used widely as food for wild birds, as well as captive birds, reptiles and amphibians. Another less common but similar species, the Dark Mealworm Tenebrio obscura is sometimes used, the larva being somewhat smaller in size.

 How much to feed and when

Try to balance the amount of food that you provide against the number of birds coming in to feed. In this way you will avoid creating a surplus of food that might go off or attract unwanted visitors, such as rats. Good practice is to clear your bird table down each night, removing uneaten food and any droppings.

Feeding throughout the year is recommended by conservation organisations, as it is not just during the winter that birds are under stress. If you are going away on holiday, then reduce the amount of food provided in the days leading up to your departure so the birds don't find that their favoured resource has suddenly disappeared.

Squirrel proof bird feeder

New Squirrel Proof Bird Feeder from Roamwild - Pest-Off Bird Feeder - Not just 100% squirrel proof also pest proof!

Finally - A squirrel proof bird feeder that works - NEW PRODUCT - the Pest-Off bird feeder by Roamwild is not just 100% squirrel proof but is also pest proof.  Designed, developed and tested, this bird feeder is has been designed by an ex-Dyson Design engineer and really does work.  Each seed access port is individually spring loaded, so anything heavier than a songbird will shut off the food ports.  With many other pest proof features designed in the product is also easy to fill and easy to clean.  It also comes at a price that will not break the bank and comes in 3 different variants, mixed seed, peanut and nyjer seed, so you can feed all species of songbird.  This bird feeder really is better than then rest!

 

What to feed wild birds in winter?

What to feed wild birds in winter?

Although winter feeding benefits birds most, food shortages can occur at any time of the year. By feeding the birds year round, you'll give them a better chance to survive the periods of food shortage whenever they may occur.

Autumn and winter

At this time of year, put out food and water on a regular basis. In severe weather, feed twice daily if you can: in the morning and in the early afternoon.

Birds require high energy (high fat) foods during the cold winter weather to maintain their fat reserves to survive the frosty nights. Use only good quality food and scraps.

Always adjust the quantity given to the demand, and never allow uneaten foods to accumulate around the feeders. Once you establish a feeding routine, try not to change it as the birds will become used to it and time their visits to your garden accordingly.

Spring and summer

Only feed selected foods at this time of year. Good hygiene is vital, or feeding may do more harm than good.

During the summer months, birds require high protein foods, especially while they are moulting.

Black sunflower seeds, pinhead oatmeal, soaked sultanas, raisins and currants, mild grated cheese, mealworms, waxworms, mixes for insectivorous birds, good seed mixtures without loose peanuts, RSPB food bars and summer seed mixture are all good foods to provide. Soft apples and pears cut in half, bananas and grapes are also good. Some people use soaked dog or cat food and tinned pet foods, but these may attract magpies, crows and cats.

Avoid using peanuts, fat and bread at this time, since these can be harmful if adult birds feed them to their nestlings. If you feel you must put out peanuts, only do so in suitable mesh feeders that will not allow sizeable pieces of peanuts to be removed and provide a choking risk.

Home-made fatballs can go soft and rancid in warm summer weather, and should be avoided. Commercially produced fat bars are suitable for summer feeding but discard any remains after three weeks.

Temporary food shortage can occur at almost any time of the year, and if this happens during the breeding season, extra food on your bird table can make a big difference to the survival of young.

Birds time their breeding period to exploit the availability of natural foods: earthworms in the case of blackbirds and song thrushes, and caterpillars in the case of tits and chaffinches. It is now known that if the weather turns cold or wet during spring or summer, severe shortage of insect food can occur, and if the weather is exceptionally dry, earthworms will be unavailable to the ground feeders because of the hard soil.

Natural food shortages

If food shortages occur when birds have young in the nest they may be tempted by easy food put on birdtables to make up the shortfall in natural food, initially to feed themselves, but if the situation gets bad enough, they will also take the food to the nest.

If the food offered on your bird table isn't suitable for the young chicks, it can do more harm than good, and can even be lethal to the chicks as they can choke on the food. It can be difficult for a human to gauge when food shortage in the wild occurs, and hence it is best not to put out food that is likely to create problems during the breeding season.

Therefore, never put out loose peanuts, dry hard foods, large chunks of bread, or fats during the spring or summer months.

Bondic™ is The World’s First Liquid Plastic Welder

Bondic™ is The World’s First Liquid Plastic Welder

We are very pleased to now offer you Bondic™ is The World’s First Liquid Plastic Welder and is the only product that Works where Glue FAILS! It’s liquid plastic that only hardens when you need it to. YES it stays liquid and won’t dry out like those crazy glues on the market today. With Bondic™ you can bond, build, fix and fill almost anything, it’s a 3D tool that fits in your pocket. Use it on plastic, wood, metal and even fabric! It is a very simple 4-step process (clean, fill, cure and shape) saving countless precious items from ending up in the trash before their time.

Glue is DEAD! Bondic™ – Your Hard Fix for Sticky Situations – try it now! You will never believe how you lived without it.

We are very pleased to now offer youBondic™ is The World’s First Liquid Plastic Welder and is the only product that Works where Glue FAILS! It’s liquid plastic that only hardens when you need it to. YES it stays liquid and won’t dry out like those crazy glues on the market today. With Bondic™ you can bond, build, fix and fill almost anything, it’s a 3D tool that fits in your pocket. Use it on plastic, wood, metal and even fabric! It is a very simple 4-step process (clean, fill, cure and shape) saving countless precious items from ending up in the trash before their time.

Glue is DEAD! Bondic™ – Your Hard Fix for Sticky Situations – try it now! You will never believe how you lived without it.

Keepsake Stone Making Kits

Keepsake Stone Making Kits

Capture your memories!  This original DIY stone making kit is quality made in the USA.  What's special about The Keepsake Garden Stone Kit, is the cement mix.  They spent 6 months developing their specially blended cement so it makes up great!  

Create your own personalized and unique design with hand/foot prints, gem stones, glass butterfly, mosaic tiles, or your own keepsakes (medals, rings, etc).  Celebrate that special date or memory with a Keepsake Garden Stone created by you!  

All accessories included!:  Special Cement Mix, 12" mold, mixing stick, glass butterfly, mosaic tiles, blue & green glass gem stones, optional terra cotta coloring and lots of different ideas.

The reusable, 100% recycled plastic mold is extra large so older kids can fit both hand prints, and is great for long names!

Beautifully presented in a quality colored box, this makes an ideal present for anyone.  Save the mold and order KGS Refill Mix to make more!

Capture your memories!  This original DIY stone making kit is quality made in the USA.  What's special about The Keepsake Garden Stone Kit, is the cement mix.  They spent 6 months developing their specially blended cement so it makes up great!  

Create your own personalized and unique design with hand/foot prints, gem stones, glass butterfly, mosaic tiles, or your own keepsakes (medals, rings, etc).  Celebrate that special date or memory with a Keepsake Garden Stone created by you!  

All accessories included!:  Special Cement Mix, 12" mold, mixing stick, glass butterfly, mosaic tiles, blue & green glass gem stones, optional terra cotta coloring and lots of different ideas.

The reusable, 100% recycled plastic mold is extra large so older kids can fit both hand prints, and is great for long names!

Beautifully presented in a quality colored box, this makes an ideal present for anyone.  Save the mold and order KGS Refill Mix to make more!